Non-invasive Continuous Ocular Glucose Sensor

ECE Professors Jeff Walling and Jaesok Jeon are collaborating on the development of a low power ocular sensor that continually monitors blood glucose levels using a chemical sensor embedded in a contact lens. Continuous monitoring of blood glucose levels will improve monitoring of diabetic patients and can also aid epidemiological studies for diet other healthcare related issues. This technology allows for non-invasive monitoring of blood sugar potentially ending the need for painful needle sticks among diabetic patients.

Professor Madabhushi, Co-Investigator for $3.3 million NIH Grant Awarded for Prostate Cancer Research

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. – The National Institutes of Health has awarded a $3.3 million grant to a research team that includes Rutgers University to increase the reliability of imaging prostate cancer.

The team, led by Riverside Research Institute and involving clinicians from Boston’s Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and engineers at GE Global Research, will research ways to help urologists zero in on suspicious tissue in the prostate gland while they perform needle biopsies or localized treatments for prostate cancer.

Slow light on a Silicon Chip - What’s the Limit?

The information bandwidth of lightwave is much higher than today’s electronic information technology. Processing information on lightwave thus has a significant advantage. Temporarily slowing down light on silicon chip allows us to complete the information processing in a small chip before light rushes off the chip. However, significant loss of light intensity occurs as light slows down. This fundamentally limits our capability in optical processing information on a small chip.

Rutgers ECE Student collaborates with Siemens on Biomedical Research Project

Rutgers’ graduate student Sushil Mittal has collaborated with a group of researchers from Siemens Corporate Research and Siemens Healthcare on a biomedical research project. Under the tutelage of Professor Peter Meer, Mr. Mittal spearheaded the project while interning at Siemens Corporate Research in Princeton, NJ. Mr. Mittal is the first author on the first published paper, “Fast Automatic Detection of Calcified Coronary Lesions in 3D Cardiac CT Images*,” to feature research from the project.

Mobility First

The National Science Foundation has awarded a three-year, $7.5 million grant to a Rutgers-led research team to develop a future Internet design optimized for mobile networking and communication.
The team of nine universities and several industrial partners has dubbed its project "MobilityFirst", reflecting the Internet's evolution away from traditional wired connections between desktop PCs and servers toward wireless data services on mobile platforms.

Sensors aim to monitor smoker activity

The University's Center for Autonomic Computing developed a wireless sensor project that detects human motion and can further medical research.

The sensors, which are small devices that attach to the body, contain accelerometers and gyroscopes that measure movement and can tell what action a person is doing, said Alex Weiner, a School of Engineering junior who is fine-tuning the algorithm of the sensors.

Pages

Subscribe to Rutgers University, Electrical & Computer Engineering RSS