Elastic Pathing Research featured in IEEE Spectrum, Communications of the ACM, YouTube, Rutgers Today, and MIT Technology Review

janne-212x218c.jpg

Prof. Janne Lindqvist's research shows that how fast you drive might reveal exactly where you are going.   Dr. Lindqvist's work on Elastic Pathing is featured in Rutgers Today
http://news.rutgers.edu/research-news/rutgers-researchers-show-how-fast-you-drive-might-reveal-exactly-where-you-are-going/20140810

Prof. Lindqvist's Elastic Pathing research has been featured in many publications and news media including YouTube and in MIT Technology Review
http://www.technologyreview.com/view/523346/how-to-track-vehicles-using-speed-data-alone/

Dr. Lindqvist's research is featured in the Communications of the ACM
http://cacm.acm.org/news/177802-rutgers-researchers-show-that-how-fast-you-drive-might-reveal-exactly-where-you-are-going/fulltext

and the front page of the IEEE Spectrum
http://sprectrum.ieee.org

Prof. Janne Lindqvist, an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, member of WINLAB and director of the Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory, led a team to show how just your driving speed can be used to track where you drive.   This work, "Elastic Pathing: Your Speed is Enough to Track You" is part of a NSF-funded project for which Prof. Janne Lindqvist is the sole Principal Investigator.  

Prof. Lindqvist's paper can be found at   http://www.winlab.rutgers.edu/~janne/elasticpathing-ubicomp14.pdf and the YouTube video can be accessed by clicking below.

Prof. Janne Lindqvist's team included former PhD student  Dr. Berhard Firner, with ECE PhD students Yulong Yang and Xianyi Gao, recently graduated Master's student Shridatt Sugrim and undergraduate student Victor Kaiser-Pendergast.

The motivation for the project was that today people increasingly have the opportunity to opt-in to "usage-based" automotive insurance programs for reducing insurance premiums. In these programs, participants install devices in their vehicles that monitor their driving behavior, which raises some privacy concerns. Some devices collect fine-grained speed data to monitor driving habits.