ECE Colloquium - September 11th


Prof. Janne Lindqvist, Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, Rutgers University

DateTime: 
Wednesday, September 11, 2013 - 10:00am - 12:00pm
Location: 

CAIT Auditorium 100 Brett Road

Title:Nudging People with Computer Systems

Abstract:
Computer systems today affect directly or indirectly billions of people. For example, using mobile phones directly integrates computer systems into people’s daily lives. In this talk, I will present my research program on redesigning computer systems for detecting and nudging behavior change. We will discuss how to redesign mobile phone platforms to make privacy-sensitive sensor access (e.g. localization) transparent to users, and how this affects their behavior. We will also discuss how similar approaches can be used for other important societal purposes including password security, mitigating distracted driving and bringing people together in local communities.

Bio:
Janne Lindqvist is an assistant professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and a member of WINLAB at Rutgers University. Janne leads the Rutgers Human-Computer Interaction group. From 2011-2013, Janne was an assistant research professor of ECE at Rutgers.

Prior to Rutgers, Janne was a post-doc with the Human-Computer Interaction Institute at Carnegie Mellon University’s School of Computer Science. Janne received his M.Sc. degree in 2005, and D.Sc. degree in 2009, both in Computer Science and Engineering from Helsinki University of Technology, Finland. He works at the intersection of human-computer interaction, mobile computing and security engineering. Before joining academia, Janne co-founded a wireless networks company, Radionet, which was represented in 24 countries before being sold to Florida-based Airspan Networks in 2005. His work has been featured several times in MIT Technology Review and recently also in New York Times, phys.org, Tech Republic, and other online venues. During his first year at Rutgers, Janne was awarded three NSF grants totaling nearly $1.3 million and a MobiCom best paper award.